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20120701
20120731
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years as we see the kinds of situations we found ourselves in. i can go back to the invasion of panama in 1989 and go forward. we realize just having a military battle that you want is not the end of the game,. perhaps he should have done more in the beginning to avoid that battle for having won the battle, how do we keep the peace and preserve the peace tax would have to be careful when we talk about these terms such as smart power or hard power or soft power. i am reminded of a conversation i had with the former archbishop of canterbury. in 2003. you might have been there. it was on the eve of the gulf war. the archbishops stood up and said," general powell, why don't we just use soft power?" it was a critique of what we are getting ready to do. it was not soft power that rescued britain from hitler. it was hard power and you have to have that. but when we won world war two with hard power, we switched to soft power in asia and germany to create democracy. the importance of this coalition that makes what we are doing so very important is that we understand that we needed all but we h
on what were then military interventions. went to panama. went to bosnia. desert storm, of course. by the time 9/11 came, i had a lot of field time. and i had a lot of combat time as a bystander. usually as a terrified bystander. it was a little uncomfortable, because a lot of guys in the military had no exposure to war. there would ask me sometimes, "what is it like?" i had to say, i am not a soldier. i do not participate. i just watch it happen and write about it. then, of course, 9/11 came. we went to afghanistan and iraq. pretty soon, we have a whole generation of really combat hardened veterans. >> different organizations to work for? >> time magazine, when i was in africa. i worked at "the washington star" for a year before it collapsed. i went to the l.a. times and covered the pentagon. i worked for a small newspaper wire service in washington, a great job. it folded and i went to the baltimore sun. they laid me off when they were closing the washington bureau. i went to aol, a little website called "politics daily." the net merged with the huffington post, i went to the hu
about passage of the panama, colombia, and korea free trade agreements, and once again they are providing tremendous leadership on our goal of creating good american jobs by prying open that mark and ensuring that the united states worker will have access to it. if you think about not only creating jobs here, but dealing with the problems of crony capitalism, dealing with the problems of a massive bureaucracy, and dealing with a corrupt court system which is what exists under putin today, this is the right thing for us to do. we should not lose access to the market. i also want to note that my very good friend, mr. herger, who has been a great leader on the issue of trade is here, mr. berg is here who has very involved in this. i would be happy to yield to my friend from new york, mr. reed, who has played an important role on this issue. mr. reed: i thank the gentleman. i rise today in strong support to join my friend from california as he knows we have been supportive of free trade from the moment we got here. i was so pleased to see colombia, panama, and south korea b
the panama and then across the is mas -- is mas -- isthmus of panama and up the coast of california. my own relatives took advantage of the two infrastructure projects you talked about. however, your governor was building off some of the work of the founding fathers. a lot of talk about here that there's no role for government in the economy. george washington disagreed. his treasury secretary, alexander hamilton, disagree. they had a debate with jefferson who thought that we ought to be an agrarian state and george washington and hamilton thought there was a role for industrial and manufacturing. so george washington in his very first days as president put -- told alexander hamilton to put together an industrial policy for america. and there were about, i think, nine points or maybe 12 points in that industrial policy. one of them was, build the infrastructure. specifically it said canals and harbors. this gos back to the very beginning of our country, what the president wanted to do and what us democrats want to do is build the infrastructure. the foundation upon which the economy grows.
. most financial investors money came from corporations registered in panama, then one of the world's most secretive business jurisdictions, offering a confidentiality intense advantages. previously unreleased details and other public records -- bain capital was emeshed in the largely opaque world of international high finance from its inception. romney faces increasing criticism for his own involvement in exotic offshore investment funds. that is front page of the chicago tribune this morning. and the lead story in the miami herald is -- in congress, few released their congress. nancy pelosi was an phatic. mitt romney the's to release more than two years of his tax return, it makes him unfit to win confirmation as a member of the president's cabinet, let alone hold the high office himself. harry reid went further. his refusal to make public tax record makes him unfit to be a dogcatcher. they do not think that standard of transparency should apply to them. the democratic leaders of the senate and house are among hundreds of senators and representatives from both parties who refused
? >why? >> i can go back to the invasion of panama in 1989 and worked for. we realize that just having a military battle you had one was not the end of the game. perhaps we should have done at the beginning to avoid that battle in the first time -- place or, having won the battle, how do we preserve the peace? >> you have to be careful when we talk about these terms such as smart power or heart power or soft power. i'm reminded of a conversation i had with the former archbishop of canterbury in 2003. you might have been there. it was on the eve of the second gulf war. the archbishops stood up and said, general powell, why don't we just use soft power? it was a critique of what we were getting ready to do. the answer i gave him was that it was not soft power that rescue britain from hitler. it was part power. you had to have all of it. when we won with hard power in world war ii, we use soft power in germany and asia to create democracies. the importance of this coalition, what makes what we are doing tonight so important, is that we understand that we need it all. we have been shortcha
are being widend and as ships are built larger as the panama canal has widend we need ports and rail facility that is can accommodate them and we must make sure that other countries are playing fair and abiding by the rules. the enfoors act, a bipartisan bill sponsored by representatives linda sanchez and congressman billy long will establish new procedures for investigating claims against foreign manufacturers for evading anti-dumping and counter vailing duty orders. it will help us better enforce trade rules and prevent illegal imports. in addition to these measures, the house energy and commerce committee came together in a bipartisan vote last month to send to the house floor a make it in america bill sponsored by bill lip ski of illinois. it is called the american manufacturing competitiveness act. it calls for the development of a national manufacturing strategy. you can't win the game if you don't have a playbook. you can't win the game if you don't have a strategy to do so. the national manufacturing strategy will bring together public and private sectors together to create a
, in norman di, england, mexico city, and panama, we have 140,000 crosses or other symbols that might be projected as being religious. sadly, what we've got going on in san diego, it's those who claim in the name of religious tolerance, want to destroy our war memorials, if anyone takes offense to this, all this does, we're -- all this says, we're not going to tear down the four million crosses on the veterans' memorials across the country and we're not going to tear down or use any funds from this budget to tear down the war memorial that stands on top of mount soledad at la jolla, san diego, california. i hope my colleagues can say in the spirit of tolerance, no one needs to go out and be so intolerant as to tear down war memorials because somebody may claim it may have a religious connotation. god knows, we don't want to start tearing down the four million crosses that exist today or those thousands of star of davids that proudly sit today on veterans and federal property. >> will the gentleman yield? mr. bilbray: yes. mr. free ling -- mr. young: we support your amendment. mr. bilb
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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